Author Archives: worldwideinsure

Planning A Ski Holiday – A Guide For Beginners

If you want to know how to do something well, you need to find out from those in the know! We asked some leading experts on the ski scene about what to pack, how to get fit, where to head, what to do to avoid injury, and a bit about etiquette so you can hit the slopes with confidence this ski season!

Ten Things You Need To Know Before Learning to Ski

© Merci L’Agence / OT Les Arcs

© Merci L’Agence / OT Les Arcs

Paul Deadman, ski expert at Neilson Holidays, shares ten things you need to know before skiing abroad for the first time.

  1. The fitter you are the more fun you’ll have. There’s no need to go into any extreme fitness training before a ski holiday, but doing a small amount of exercise in preparation will make a big difference to your fun factor.
  2. You need the right shoes. As well as packing ski boots you’ll need shoes for off the slopes too. Resorts are still snowy and can be icy, so take practical shoes – a sturdy pair of trainers or walking boots work well. Bars and restaurants won’t turn you away if you’re not in fancy heels or polished brogues – slope style is much more relaxed, think more along the lines of ‘practi-cool’.
  3. You still need sunscreen. Even if you don’t think it’s sunny, the sun reflects off the bright white snow and increases the chances of sun damage to your skin. Take lip balm with UVA and UVB protection as well as sun cream for your face and apply regularly over the course of the day.
  4. Helmets are a must. Hire or buy your own, but either way don’t hit the slopes without one.
  5. Accept that you will fall over. A lot. The people who get to grips with skiing the fastest are those who aren’t afraid of falling over. Don’t be discouraged by falling down, it would be really weird if you learnt to ski without falling over at least eight times a day!
  6. Après ski is the post-ski social scene. The ski lifts usually close between 4 and 5pm. This is when everyone comes off the mountain, back to the town and enjoys some après ski. Bars and restaurants will have live bands or DJs, some more lively than others, and you’ll find somewhere to relax to suit you whether you want a chocolat chaud, a vin rouge or a round of Chartreuse.
  7. Ski boots feel a bit odd at first. In my experience, at best ski boots are mildly uncomfortable and at worst can prevent you from enjoying skiing completely. Putting ski boots on will feel strange the first time, and for your first trip it’s worth getting someone with experience to help you with your boot clips to make sure they’re tight enough each morning. The correct boot should feel tight, but not unbearable, you should be able to wiggle your toes…just. Tip: make sure you wear thick socks when you pick them up – you don’t want to get a pair fitted in thin socks to realise that they’re too tight when you put on your ski socks.
  8. Pistes are colour coded. For most European resorts the ski runs (pistes) are marked to show what ability they’re suitable for. Nursery or green slopes will be where you’ll start your ski education, and you could progress to slightly steeper blue runs by the end of the week. Red slopes suit intermediate skiers and black runs are for advanced skiers. ‘Off piste’ refers to any territory that isn’t on marked out ski runs and isn’t something you’d need to worry about as a beginner. North America and Canada mark their pistes slightly differently so make sure you know what the colours are for the resort you’re travelling to.
  9. Lessons start early! Lessons typically start first thing in the mornings (approx. 9.30am) each day and finish at lunch.
  10. You might get hooked. Skiing is one of the best feelings in the world! It might feel like hard work, but the mountain views, endorphins, delicious food and après ski will make you want to return year after year. It’s that feeling you get when you nail that tricky run you’ve been struggling with all week that really gets you hooked though!

How To Get Fit For The Ski Season

© andyparant.com / OT Val d’Isere

© andyparant.com / OT Val d’Isere

Luke Thornton, Fitness Advisor to Discount Supplements takes us through the best moves to boost physical fitness for maximum on-piste performance.

Balance is one of the most important aspects of fitness for snow sports. Twists, turns and high speeds mean you need to have a strong core and an incredible sense of balance. These exercises focus on full body movements and stabilising exercises to really tax your midsection, and lock in that core strength.

Squats – a fantastic movement for working your entire body. This move not only uses your glutes, hamstrings, calves and quads, but also your core for stabilising your body whilst in motion. Keep your abs tight, place your feet shoulder width apart with your head up and descend down into a sitting position, then using your legs, drive upwards until standing. Repeat for 8-12 reps. These can be done with just body weight, or you can add a barbell to increase resistance.

Press Ups – the king of all upper body moves. The press up works your triceps, biceps, chest and shoulders. Add an advanced variation with an exercise ball to increase your core stability and improve balance. Lie face down and place your hands on the floor either side of your shoulders. One by one put your feet onto an exercise ball and assume the push up position.

Long Distance Cycling – not only is this fantastic for your overall cardiovascular health, it also increases endurance and strength in your legs, which is essential for snow sports. If you don’t have a road bike or access to one, use a stationary bike at your gym. Start short at 2km, then move to 5, 10 and 20. Mix it up and try to beat your time on each distance.

Lunges – another brilliant move for leg development, core strength and balance. Try adding walking lunges at the end of every workout to increase endurance in the quads and glutes, and to mix up your cardio. Try 10 stationary lunges for each leg, then 20, then move onto walking lunges. You can also mix it up further by walking with dumbbells.

Packing For A Ski Holiday

Image by tookapic CC0

Image by tookapic CC0

While toothbrush, passport and boarding passes may be obvious items to pack, there are a few essentials that might not be obvious to a first-time skier. Claire Flynn at Powder Beds shares some insider tips.

Skis, boots and helmet: For novices or people relatively new to skiing, it’s worthwhile renting skis, boots and a helmet, rather than buying them AND paying for ski carriage on a flight. Skiset work in resorts across Europe offering different ski hire packages depending on what you want. It’s also worth booking in advance to make sure you get the best deal and what you want.

Taking your own ski equipment? Airport Parking and Hotels (APH) have created a nifty Baggage Allowance Finder. The tool helps you find the baggage allowances for major airlines across the UK, perfect for finding out how much it will cost to get your skis across the skies!

Clothes for the slopes: Bring thermals, fleeces, warm jacket, salopettes, thick socks, goggles and don’t forget proper waterproof gloves. Also, neck scarves (Buffs) are useful for keeping your face warm on the slopes.

Sun protection: Make sure to bring suncream (or buy it in the resort), and apply it even when it’s cloudy. It’s also a good idea to bring a decent pair of sunglasses, so you can change out of your goggles if you stop for lunch on the slopes.

Clothes for off-piste activities: Bring warm clothes and decent shoes with good grip for walking about the resort in the evening.

Other items that might make your time in the snow warmer, easier or more fun are:

Sundown Lock

Sundown Ski Lock, Blacks

• Day rucksack
• Water bottle
• Ski Lock
• Thermos
• Hand warmers
• Foot warmers
• Muscle rub/soak
• Ankle, knee and wrist supports

Check out skiclub.co.uk for a foolproof packing list, and if you are looking to grab some ski clothes and accessories – without paying a design label premium – Blacks have a superb range.

WINTERSPORT INSURANCE

ossur-image-2-ski-mega-blog

© Courtesy of Össur

WINTERSPORT INSURANCE IS AN ESSENTIAL PIECE OF YOUR KIT WHEN YOU HEAD OUT ON SKIS! Even if you are holidaying in the EU, you should make sure that your travel insurance covers you for the activities you plan to do. Wintersports insurance from worldwideinsure.com provides cover for equipment, ski packs, cancelled flights, medical assistance and repatriation for all destinations including even if you want to go off-piste, heli-skiing, and parapenting!

Best Ski Resort for Beginners – Avoriaz

© Stephane Lerendu / OT Avoriaz

© Stephane Lerendu / OT Avoriaz

• Only truly car-free resort in France.
• Offers access to the fantastic Portes du Soleil ski area.
• Perfect for beginners thanks to the several easy green runs through the village, plus a great selection of ski schools, including Le Village des Enfants (located in the heart of the resort with two distinct areas for skiing abilities). Avoriaz Alpine Ski School is another excellent ski school – small team of British and local instructors offering high quality tuition, for all ages.
• Also great range of runs for intermediates and over 30 black runs for advanced, including the World Cup Downhill which drops from Les Hauts Forts.
• One of the world’s leading freestyle centres with three snowparks and a superpipe.
• Good areas for beginner and intermediate boarders, as well as plenty of powder for freeriding.
• One of the highest resorts in the Alps so snow cover isn’t often a problem, except for some of the runs below resort height.
• Accommodations are generally all ski-in/ski-out offering easy access to the slopes for first-timers.
• Also great non-ski activities available to keep everyone busy – Aquariaz claims to be Europe’s highest waterpark, complete with a main pool, lazy river, half-pipe, mini flume, Jacuzzis and tropical vegetation. There’s also dog sledding, snowshoeing and ice skating.
• Where to stay – Residence L’Amara offers luxurious ski-in/ski-out apartments at the entrance of the resort, with a private car park, indoor swimming pool, fitness room and Deep Nature Spa.

Best Ski Resort If You Are Travelling With Intermediates – Les Arcs

© Merci Creative / OT Les Arcs

© Merci Creative / OT Les Arcs

• One of the biggest resorts in the Alps, with a choice of four different base villages, located in the huge and varied Paradiski area.
• More than 125km of fast long and blue and red runs on the Les Arcs side of Paradiski alone – superb for intermediate skiers.
• Can also use the Vanoise express to cross over to the La Plagne side to experience more terrain. Although, as there is so much terrain in Les Arcs, it is only worth doing this for a day, so opt for the Paradiski Discovery Pass rather than the full Paradiski pass.
• Also has a strong reputation for advanced terrain with more than 40km of black runs, divided into 19 runs.
• Beginners are also well-catered for with gentle slopes right by the four base villages. Plus, the relatively recent Mille 8 development in Arc 1800 includes a dedicated beginners’ area.
• Also great for snowboarders – the Apocalypse Snowpark is fitted with tricks and treats for all ability levels, with great progression from beginner to intermediate to advanced features. Well-maintained and one of the better parks in the Alps.
• Non-ski activities also available – mostly from Arc 1800 – snowshoeing, dog sledding, bowling, shopping and there’s a small cinema.
• Where to stay – La Source des Arcs offers stylish and spacious ski-in/ski-out apartments in the highest altitude village of Arc 2000. However, if you’d like to be closer to the action in Arc 1800, try Residence Edenarc.

Best Ski Resort If You Have Advanced Skiers In Your Party – Val d’Isere

© andyparant.com / OT Val d’Isere

© andyparant.com / OT Val d’Isere

• Ski area traditionally known as Espace Killy, although more commonly known as Val d’Isere-Tignes these days – regarded as one of the most exciting ski areas in the world.
• One of the world’s great resorts for advanced skiers with 25 black runs to test your abilities on – including the world famous La Face run (descends nearly 2 miles from its peak) – only those brave enough should attempt it.
• The area is most famous for its off-piste (10,000 hectares), with forested areas like Daniades, accessed from the Solaise Express among the more popular.
• Also a great ski area for intermediates, with over 100 blue and red runs in the Espace Killy.
• With the redevelopment of the Solaise area due to open for this winter, Val d’Isere is also set to become a great resort for novices, with a new dedicated beginners’ area.
• Also great for boarders with a highly regarded snowpark spread over 35 hectares. Other terrain parks to try out across the Espace Killy into Tignes too.
• Also, one of the most snowsure resorts in Europe thanks to its high altitude.
• Always stays at the forefront of winter sports but has remained a picturesque main resort village, meaning it continues to attract guests from all over the world.
• With a sports centre, glacier walking, husky racing and 70 shops available, there are plenty of non-ski activities to keep you entertained also.
• Where to stay: for self-catering, opt for Chalets du Jardin Alpin, but if it’s a luxurious hotel you’re after, the five star Hotel Christiania in the centre is a very popular choice.

Après-Ski – Social Life On The Slopes

© Fruitiere / OT Val Thorens

© Fruitiere / OT Val Thorens

If going out for drinks after a long day on the slopes appeals to you, make sure to pick a resort with a good après scene. Val Thorens is great, with several bars on and off the slopes, as well as Malaysia, the highest nightclub in Europe. Val d’Isere is also a good option, being the home of the original La Folie Douce. Alpe d’Huez, Les Deux Alpes, Meribel and Verbier are also renowned for their après scenes.

The off-slope vibe may be laid back, but make sure you show your fellow après party people some respect. Here are some top tips:

Pack your gear away before heading to the bar. No one wants to have to manoeuvre their way around a bunch of skis and snow boots!

Welcome strangers into your fold – in other words, don’t hog a huge table to just a few of you. Likewise, don’t be shy if someone offers you a seat at their table – the après scene is a great way to get to know people.

• Come as you are, which means there is no need to get showered and dressed up as soon as the lift stops spinning. Unless of course you are heading to a hot tub – in which case always, ALWAYS rinse before going in.

And one more thing: If you respect your fellow guests, endeavour to not puke on them. High altitudes will have a major affect on your tolerance to alcohol. Pace yourself and have a glass of water in between drinks – skiing is heaps more fun without a hangover anyway!

Injuries At Altitude

Courtesy of Össur

© Courtesy of Össur

Nothing can bring a fun holiday to an abrupt halt like hurting yourself, and on a ski holiday the head, wrists, knees, ankles and spine are all at risk. We asked injury experts Össur for some top tips on how to avoid injuries on the slope and what to do if things don’t go to plan.

How to avoid injuries on the slope

Whilst on the whole injuries are unavoidable and sometimes just happen, there are things you can do to minimise the risk as the last thing you want is to injure yourself on day one and spend the rest of your holiday looking at the slopes rather than being on them.

1. Wear the right gear
Wearing the right gear is a good start. Without a doubt you need to wear some good winter clothing as it’s cold up in the mountains but there are a few other things which could help you.

• Helmet: Would you ever ride your bike without a helmet? No? It’s the same for winter sports. We’re not just talking rocks that you could land on, as compacted snow could be just as hazardous if you whack your head on it, so stay safe.
• Knee Bracing: Prophylactic knee bracing is becoming more popular with many professionals now sporting these carbon fibre (lightweight and strong) exoskeletons to protect the knee from injury following a fall but also to offer stability to help manage pre-existing injuries.
• Wrist Guards: Everyone falls down on the slopes, some more often than others. When we fall we put our arms out to break our fall but that can lead to broken wrists, arms, or dislocated shoulders. Wrist guards offer a degree of protection when you fall.
• Boots: A standard piece of kit but make sure you pick something suitable. Have a chat with the professionals and see what is best for you given your expertise and what you want to achieve, as more freedom of movement may be good for tricks but potentially bad for your ankles.

2. Know your limits
If you’re just starting out then it’s understandable you want to follow in the footsteps of famous skiers, but it is important that you take it easy and practice, even Jonny Moseley had to start somewhere. It’s ok to push yourself as that is the only way to get better, but you know yourself what is pushing yourself and what could be considered a little foolish.

3. Take lessons
Taking lessons is a great way to start and even the experienced skiers still take lessons to brush up on their skills, especially if you’ve had a few months off (like when there is no snow). Lessons ensure you have the right technique and most importantly, know how to fall (as in minimising the risk of injury) so book them in, listen and learn.

4. Stick to the path
When you finally arrive at your resort you’ll be as giddy as a kid at Christmas and want to do everything. Just remember that there are routes designated for each level of ability so stick to them and practice before moving up and deciding to do something adventurous. Being on the slopes is extreme enough when you’re starting out without going off-piste in search of something different and potentially dangerous.

5. Be aware of your surroundings
It’s important to remember where you are on the slopes and that you don’t only have to watch what you’re doing but also what everyone else is doing as well. It only takes one person to either do something daft or lose control and they could wipe you out as well as leave you battered and bruised, or worse.

What to do when you’ve been injured

Following an injury there are a number of steps to consider both in the immediate aftermath and throughout your overall rehabilitation journey.

1. Stop what you’re doing
If you’re injured then stop what you’re doing as carrying on could make it worse. Sprains, for example, are graded 1 to 3 depending on their severity, with a 1 being a few days of hobbling and 3 being a few months using crutches. If you sprain your ankle when running then failing to stop could turn a grade 1 to a grade 2, as you’re increasing the chances of your ankle rolling as a result of the instability.

2. Remember RICE
It’s the standard protocol following an injury and stands for rest, ice, compression and elevation.

Rest is simply giving the body time to repair itself and heal naturally.
Ice can be used to help manage inflammation as well as offering a degree of pain relief.
Compression is typically achieved through bracing but helps to manage inflammation when on the move, again having pain relieving qualities,
Elevation is the act of raising the affected area of the body above the level of the heart to reduce blood flow and in turn reduce inflammation.

You will know if an injury warrants urgent medical attention, in which case, you should seek this right away to minimise the risk of the injury worsening.

3. Obtain a professional diagnosis
If RICE doesn’t work after a few days then you should seek a professional diagnosis as it may require additional treatment following a more detailed examination.
You may be sent for an X-ray, an MRI or simply referred to a physiotherapist depending on how severe they believe the injury to be.

After a professional diagnosis you may need physio, a brace and even surgery. Overseas this can be a lot more complicated. Make sure you contact your travel insurance provider and discuss what procedures and treatments are covered.

Well, that’s the essentials covered, but nothing compares to the real thing – stay warm, stay safe and have fun wherever you end up!

© P Tournaire / OT Val Thorens

© P Tournaire / OT Val Thorens

For more information about getting the right wintersports travel insurance for this ski season, get in touch with one of the team on 01892 833338

The World’s Most Amazing Creatures and Where to Find Them

With the brand new Harry Potter film hitting the screens, we thought we’d share this awesome infographic about weird and wonderful creatures that really do exist. If you’d like to check them out yourself on an adventure, we have also compiled a list of truly magical activities to look out for at each destination, to be revealed in our next blog!


View Interactive Version (via Pokies).

6hourly App Review – Travel App of the Month November 2016

6hourly app logoMicrostays are all the rage, but how on earth is a weary traveller meant to find a place to rest for a few hours, or simply somewhere to just freshen up? Ah….. with 6hourly! At the moment, the 6hourly app is only available on Android, but the website is there for all to use – so pop a bookmark in your browser!

What is the 6hourly App?

It is the ultra convenient version of the 6hourly website, a booking site for hotels that are happy to have guests stay for just a few hours – without charging for a full 24 hours!

What does 6hourly Do?

Simply pick your city, pick your check-in time, and then how long you would like to stay (6, 12, or 18 hour microstays and 24+ hours, perfect if you are looking to book something last minute), and the search engine will provide a list of lovely places handpicked by the 6hourly team for you to choose from. All hotels are top rated 3, 4 and 5 star places to stay.

6hourly app screenshot

What would make 6hourly better?

Being worldwide! 6hourly is currently only available across 19 cities in India but the good news is they plan to roll out across Asia Pacific, Europe and USA in the near future. A budget hotel option would also be welcomed by the thriftier globetrotting individual.

We think the concept is just fabulous for travellers, especially those who are on longstay adventures, and think it would be welcomed all over the world.

6hourly App Reviews

It is early days for this venture, but initial reviews are more of a thumbs up than a thumbs down. Quick, convenient and simple – exactly what you need when you just want somewhere to stay for a few hours!

6hourly app reviews

play.google.com

Travel Mistakes You Don’t Want To Make!

beach-image-by-unsplash-cc0

Beach image by Unsplash CC0

You can ruin a beautiful holiday fast by making some seriously rookie mistakes. Find out what NOT to do next time you go away.

Overpacking – It makes your bag heavy and difficult to carry around, it may put you over your weight allowance, costing you money. Worse than that, if your bag is full to the brim, how are you going to bring back any lovely new things from your travels?

Overspending – If you think sticking to a budget sucks, then you should adjust your perspective. Make fulfilling your itinerary a creative achievement with what you have and consider which money-saving tactics you are prepared to make for each activity. Are you prepared to forego a hotel for a few nights in a hostel so you can do that big adventure?

Not having any local currency – Turning up in a new town without a bit of cash can be super-embarrassing if your driver or porter is expecting a tip. Plus, using a local ATM might carry some hefty card charges. Make sure you get your currency at a good price before you set off, either at the airport or dedicated currency exchange centre.

Having too much local currency – Not only can it be difficult taking a large amount of cash through customs, you don’t want to have “all your eggs in one basket”. Take enough money for the first couple of days – not for the duration of your stay! Pre-paid currency cards such as fairfx.com are a secure way to ensure you have all the money you need, but still make sure you have some loose cash when you travel.

Not getting travel insurance – Too many travellers seem to think that they just don’t need it, especially if they have an EHIC. The cost of medical treatment or repatriation to your home country is far higher than you might think, and you will HAVE to cover the costs yourself if you don’t have insurance. The financial implications of lost luggage and missed or cancelled flights is a minor inconvenience by comparison.

Forgetting to check visa requirements – You don’t want to fall at the last hurdle. Not many situations are much more frustrating than getting to your destination and being refused entry, so make sure you check the entry requirements for your visa. This can include having a certain number of months left on your passport, having a flight out of the country booked, an address that you will be staying at, ensuring that you have had the correct immunisations, or even that you haven’t just travelled from a certain country!

Being culturally insensitive – It isn’t just impolite, it could land you in jail! Here are some examples of how you could innocently cause offense abroad:

  • Sipping your vodka in Russia
  • Not eating enough in Greece
  • Crossing your chopsticks in Asia
  • Showing the soles of your feet in Africa
  • Giving a “thumbs up” in the Middle East
  • Wearing yellow in Malaysia

Not making copies of important documents – Either scan your documents, or take a picture. You don’t need to carry around hardcopies of your insurance, passport and travel information, but do make sure it can be accessed easily online if you need, or leave with a friend/family member back home in case of emergency.

Not checking ALL your booking details, and passport! – Turning up at the wrong airport, finding out that your passport has expired, and even getting your dates of travel wrong are all entirely possible if you are not paying enough attention. So check all your booking information thoroughly, and check again. You should also pay attention to changes in time zones if you are taking more than one flight – is it actually possible to get from A to B in the time you have?

Trying to fit too much in – Overstretching yourself with a loaded itinerary can actually be a miserable experience, so factor in some rest days in between your adventures, and for the last couple of days of your holiday. This way if you have the energy to do more, you can add a little something in rather than feeling bad (and possibly losing money) by bailing out because you are exhausted.

How To Sleep Well In An Airport

airport-image-by-ladydisdain-cc0

Airport Image by LadyDisdain CC0

A delayed flight, a layover, or an unsociably early landing are all valid reasons for needing some shut-eye at an airport – but it’s not as easy as it sounds to get a rest while waiting. Here’s what you need to know…

Understand that not all airports are sleeper-friendly. In fact, some airports may well march you out under armed guard if they find you kipping without a valid flight ticket. Check out how sleeper-friendly your destinations are before you travel!

Remember that security guards will expect travellers to have booked nearby accommodation if there is a wait between flights, or arranged transport even if it is 2am. Believe it or not, sleeping in the airport lounge isn’t part of the ticket price, so don’t waltz around like the cat that got the cream (or the traveller who got a free bed for the night).

Be prepared to answer questions about where you have come from, where you are going and be ready to show your (valid) ticket. Being polite and cooperative will get you a long way in this situation! Once you have had a chat with security, it’s unlikely they will bother you again.

Pack these few things to ensure that you get something near a decent sleep:

  • Eye mask
  • Earplugs
  • Inflatable pillow and a blanket
  • A cheap lilo

Some airports have provisions for stranded passengers, such as pop-up beds, blankets and pillows. If you have been blessed with the gift of the gab, you might be able to sweet talk someone into letting you use the facilities even if there aren’t big issues with delays.

Think about your personal security. Don’t sleep in secluded spots, don’t sleep near people that you feel unsure about, and be careful with your belongings:

  • Use your bags as a pillow/mattress/teddybear – this makes it harder for someone to try and move it without you noticing.
  • Place bag opening to the floor/wall/ towards you – again making access more difficult.
  • Wrap bag straps around your arms and legs, making them more difficult to remove.

Remember to get travel insurance – it could help you out of a sticky situation if you miss a flight or your flight is delayed!

Visiting Thailand? Dos and Don’ts Following King’s Death

thailand-image-by-mariamichelle-cc0

Thailand image by Mariamichelle CC0

The death of King Bhumibol Adulyadej on October 13 has plunged Thailand into a state of mourning not seen for many decades. Although this event has affected Thais deeply, they remain welcoming to holidaymakers keen to enjoy the country’s castor sugar beaches, lush jungle hinterlands and sunny weather.

However, ‘respect’ is the watchword for any trip to Thailand in the coming months.

What to wear and how to behave

Black clothing has virtually sold out in the country as Thais pay their respects to the late king. As a visitor you don’t need to wear black, but opting for low-key colours will put you in good stead with locals.

Avoid flamboyant attire in public places.

But as Chris Lee, UK and Ireland head of marketing for the Tourism Authority of Thailand (TAT), says: “despite reports, tourists don’t have to wear black on the beach.”

There are reports that the TAT has asked Immigration to provide visitors with black ribbons which they can wear as a sign of respect, although this hasn’t happened as yet.

Aside from asking visitors to dress respectfully, the TAT encourages them to “continue with their travel plans as normal”.

But the TAT also warns that “Visitors should refrain from conducting any inappropriate or disrespectful behaviour.”

The UK’s FCO backs this up: “Following the death of His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej there is now an official period of mourning of one year from 14 October 2016. You should respect the feelings and sensitivities of the Thai people at this time.”

Is the nightlife affected?

Bars and restaurants have been asked to tone it down by the government, so the nightlife may well be a little more subdued than usual. Most establishments will close by midnight, although owners have the final say.

Millions of Thais make a living from the country’s tourism industry, so many will be keen to keep their businesses going.

Are any tourist sites closed?

Bangkok’s Wat Phra Kaeo (Temple of the Emerald Buddha) and the Grand Palace are closed to the public, as they will be the venue of the Royal Funeral Rites. But all other tourist attractions remain open.

Traditional and cultural events will go ahead as usual, but their tone may well be modified in respect for the late king.

You can expect transportation, banks and medical facilities to operate as normal.

Talking about the king

Many Thais are open to talking about their feelings at this sad time, but as before the king’s passing, care should be taken when discussing anything related to the monarchy. Thailand’s strict lèse-majesté laws mean anyone insulting or defaming the monarchy could face a jail term of up to 15 years. If you want to be on the safe side, avoid the subject altogether unless it is broached by a local – and even then proceed with caution.

The atmosphere in tourist hotspots like the islands of Phuket, Koh Samui and Koh Phi Phi is likely to be lighter than in Bangkok, although less intense than before the king’s death. Indeed, now could be a particularly relaxed time to visit this most unique of kingdoms.

The famous Thai smile may be a little thin on the ground right now, but if you’re mindful of your host’s feelings you’ll still have a fabulous holiday.

 

HolidayPirates Review – Travel App Of The Month October 2016

holidaypirates-logoAs we “go to press” HolidayPirates may well be celebrating a major success at The British Travel Awards, having been nominated for The Best Travel Deal Provider Award 2016! Great credentials indeed, but what does that mean for those of us who are interested in the HolidayPirate travel app? Let’s splice the mainbrace and find out…

 

 

What is the HolidayPirates app?

It is the convenient, at the tip of your fingers way of finding some great deals. Flights, hotels and travel packages are researched and compiled on a daily basis, offering travellers hard to find deals. They also publish voucher campaigns too for the extra-thrifty globetrotter!

holidaypirates-screenshot-1

What can the HolidayPirates app do?

It can help you find great deals, set travel alerts, and offers advice on finding cheap flights, trains, car rental, hotels and holiday packages.

  • Deals on flights, hotels, cruises, and package holidays
  • Car hire, coach, bus, and train ticket deals
  • Travel alerts to match your dream destinations, travel dates and budget

holidaypirates-screenshot-2

 

Who is the HolidayPirates app for?

Anyone who likes to bag a bargain when it comes to going on holiday! They promise that users can save a lot of money by using the app to book a holiday to their chosen destination. It is also an app for the free-spirited, allowing you to go where the whim of wanderlust takes you.

holidaypirates-screenshot-3

What do the HolidayPirates apps reviews say?

The reviews give it the thumbs up, although they are a little out of date. Some of the gripes mentioned by users are no longer relevant after recent updates. It is interesting that users gave 5 stars anyway even when it wasn’t everything they wanted it to be!

holidaypirates-reviews

HolidayPirates is available for FREE on the iTunes Store. Find out more about what they do on HolidayPirates.com.

 

Nevada – A Spooky Place To Celebrate Halloween!

You may associate Nevada with tales of extra terrestrial activities, but did you know that it has some pretty spooky heritage? Nevada’s vast landscape is dotted with countless ghost towns – some are indecipherable ruins infested with tumbleweeds, but others are surprisingly intact. Both are portals into a Nevada of old…

Rhyolite Porter Store by Tom Babich CC2.0

Rhyolite Porter Store by Tom Babich CC2.0

Rhyolite – America’s most famous ghost town…

Rhyolite is a secluded town set on the eastern edge of Death Valley, and has a reputation for being one of the best ghost towns in the US. It was once a thriving mining town, but now the abandoned streets and buildings send shivers down the spines of those who visit. The general store, train station and bank still stand, and so does the jail, undoubtedly the most popular attraction for spooky thrill seekers who can look into the cells and imagine the tortured lives of former prisoners.

The Haunted Mizpah Hotel

Mizpah Hotel

Mizpah Hotel. Image © Travel Nevada

Between Las Vegas and Reno is a spooky hotel that is said to have some ghostly inhabitants. Here are some of the hair-raising rumours that would make great torch lit Halloween tales!

It is said that guests can hear laughter by one of the hotel’s bath tubs, possibly the ghostly echoes of a politician who died there. Rumour has it that he met his demise before an important election, but his death was hidden by his aides who decided to keep his body in a bathtub on blocks of ice instead.

The Mizpah is also home to “The Lady in Red”- the spirit of a prostitute who was murdered on the fifth floor of the hotel, viciously stabbed outside her lavish suite. Some stories say that she was killed by a jealous ex-boyfriend, whereas others say she was caught cheating by her husband at the hotel after he had missed a train – he then proceeded to kill her in a fit of jealous rage. She has also made appearances in the original elevator the hotel features, which at its installation was the fastest elevator in the state!

The ghosts of Mizpah are said to reside across the eerie building – there have been several sightings of ghosts of children playing throughout the hallway on the third floor, and it is said that the ghosts of miners can be seen walking through the walls of the creepy basement too.

The Lady in Red Suite Courtesy of Travel Nevada © Travel Nevada

Brave guests can stay in The Lady in Red Suite for as little as £122 a night. Image © Travel Nevada

Creepy Clowns of Highway 95

clown-motel

Image © Travel Nevada

Like all good spooky places to visit in Nevada, Tonopah was once a thriving mining town, which now has an extra eerie appeal to visitors. Along the highway of this desert town lies the Clown Motel, a roadside rest place stuffed to the brim with clowns and clown collectables. The hotel itself may not be haunted – it’s just the creepy clowns that are guaranteed to give guests night terrors – but the Cemetery next door probably is. It has been closed for over a hundred years and is packed with graves of former miners many of which died from the mysterious “Tonopah Plague” in 1902.

Avoid the fright of your life on holiday! Get travel insurance!

While we don’t insure against ghouls and ghosts, we can provide cover for a range of holiday mishaps – Get in touch or visit our website to find out more about single trip, multi trip and long stay travel insurance.

3 Of The Best Airports To Be Stuck At

There is something special and somewhat surreal about the atmosphere at an airport, but some are definitely more of a pleasure than others. We reveal three of the best airports in the world – the kind you would wish you were in if you were stranded!

Changi Airport, Singapore

Changi Airport, Singapore by cegoh CC0

Changi Airport, Singapore by cegoh CC0

This place is more like a leisure complex than an airport, combined with an art gallery and possibly the Eden Project in the UK. In fact, it is a destination in itself! Here are a few of the things that make it the perfect place to while away some hours…

  • You can go on a nature trail in the butterfly garden
  • Try out 12m long airport slide
  • View international works of art, sculpture and installation
  • Have spa treatments
  • Go shopping for designer goods
  • Explore the interactive enchanted garden
  • Visit the airport zoo
  • Stay in a luxury hotel without checking out
  • Swim in the rooftop pool
  • Go to the movies

Incheon International Airport, Seoul

Incheon International Airport, Seoul by zionorbi CC2.0

Incheon International Airport, Seoul by zionorbi CC2.0

This airport has won awards for the last 11 years for it’s outstanding facilities, and for keeping passengers happy too. It’s super-spacious and offers travellers a lot of ways to pass the time…

  • Get your skates on at the ice rink
  • Go get rich in the casino
  • Improve your handicap at the golf course
  • Relax in the spa, bath or sauna
  • Catch some zzzzs in one of the sleeping rooms
  • Explore one of the many beautiful airport gardens
  • Brush up on your local knowledge at the museum

Munich Airport, Germany

Munich Airport by Alexas_Fotos CC0

Munich Airport by Alexas_Fotos CC0

This airport has been likened to a city centre thanks to its huge array of eateries, watering holes and shops. It is also one of the busiest airports in Europe, here’s what visitors get to experience…

  • Indulge in retail therapy in one of the 150+ shops
  • Eat and drink in any of the 50+ bars
  • Enjoy the atmosphere of a real German rooftop beer garden
  • Explore the in-house art gallery
  • Swim in a stainless steel pool
  • Visit the Audi showroom

Although these airports would seem like a great place to spend some holiday time, if your flight is delayed or cancelled it could cause havoc with more than just your holiday plans, it could affect your finances too. Travel insurance from WorldwideInsure.com provides the cover you need in the event that travel plans don’t go to plan – to find out more, get in touch with us on 01892 833338 or get a fast and free online quote.

 

How To Bag A Cheap Round The World Flight

Want to know how you can travel for as little as 94p (and avoid paying as much as £170) per 100km? We’ve discovered a super-clever aviation price index that will help you plan your travel itinerary in the most cost-effective way possible!

Image by Holgi, CC0

Image by Holgi, CC0

Did you know that hundreds of factors affect the price of flights? The price of oil, the route you choose, and even where in the world you are when you book your ticket online? There are many travellers that also think the time of day and day of week you search for flights affects the price too – but evidence for this is inconclusive. For anyone wanting to travel the world on a shoestring budget, deciphering all the variables to find the best priced flights could be a very lengthy task indeed – by which time prices would have changed anyway!

Cue the clever chaps and chapettes at Kiwi.com who have created an algorithm capable of combining flights from non-cooperating airlines onto a single itinerary, which has the pleasant result of being able to offer travellers significant savings!

That isn’t all their algorithm can do – it can also identify where in the world and on which type of flight you pay more for your travel. Here are the Top Ten Countries where you can find the CHEAPEST flights…

least expensive flights

Courtesy of at Kiwi.com

And the Top Ten Countries where you WILL PAY THE MOST

most expensive flights

Courtesy of at Kiwi.com

This means you can use the power of the aviation price index to inform your travel plans and help you see the world for far less than you probably thought. Perfect for round the world trips or for letting your budget dictate your travel adventures!