Category Archives: Destination Guide

Lagom – The Swedish Goldilocks Principle for Globetrotters

Lagom – a Swedish word that has no direct translation. It more or less means not too much, not too little, just the right amount. It can be applied to every aspect of life – whether that be the amount of cream you have in your coffee, the way you dress, how you decorate your home, or how you travel! Here are some top travel tips that we think hit the lagom vibe.

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Take an extended break

In Sweden it is common for people to take three to four weeks off in the summer to enjoy the weather. While this isn’t an option for everyone, the key is to make sure that you take more days than you think you need to enjoy your holiday. So, if it is a weekend city break you are going on, add an extra day either side to prepare, and to come home and relax after travelling. Going on a longer holiday? Same principle – take more days than you think you need, you’ll be glad of it when your itinerary is approaching capacity.

Plan a sensible itinerary

Cramming in sightseeing and activities to a pre-booked holiday is not adhering to lagom. You don’t want to do so little you feel like you are wasting time, but you also don’t want to be rushed off your feet trying to fit everything in – you want balance. Before you book your holiday decide what it is you want to do, how much time you ideally need to enjoy each activity to its fullest, and also how long it will take to get from A to B to C… Then add some time for doing NOTHING – only with space in your schedule can you embrace something spontaneous, or take some time to rest between adventures! Once you know that, create your itinerary and book your holiday. If it feels like there is too much for the holiday time you can take, remember you can always come back another time!

Get close to nature

Lagom is about keeping things simple, something a spell in the great outdoors can provide in abundance, but remember we aren’t aiming for extremes! Enjoy outdoor activities that are within your skill-range, environments that aren’t going to cause discomfort, and above all, remember to dress for the weather. There is a saying “There is no such thing as bad weather, only bad clothes.”

Eat fresh, eat local

You can also use the concept of lagom to enjoy the local cuisine – in moderation of course. So, bingeing on steak and red wine in Argentina is not lagom, but indulging in a fine cut with a reserve occasionally during your stay is. Choose items off the menu that do not have a negative impact on the wellbeing of local wildlife or ecosystems – something to be mindful of in places where the popularity of seafood is leading to an overfishing problem. Finally, only eat what you need, no need to go large, order big, or have three courses when two will do.

Choose ethical travel

Low impact and ethical travel is on the rise. This encompasses a wide range of tourist activities that take the excessive side of tourism into account, things like damage to flora and fauna, overcrowding, and negative impacts on the economy and the life of locals. Wherever you travel make sure that you are adding to the local economy during your stay, that you leave as little trace as possible while you are there, and that you are mindful of the impact of your presence in everything you do.

Fun Things To Do In Gothenburg On A Short City Break

Summer in Sweden is the perfect time for a short city break and with a wonderfully short flight from the UK, Gothenburg is the ideal destination!

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Take A Paddan Boat Tour of the City

The low, wide Paddan tour boats are an idyllic way to explore the city, and learn about the sights from a tour guide. The canal boat goes around most of the 17thCentury canals in the city, passing sightseeing hotspots, harbours, and passing under many beautiful bridges!

Kayak The Gothenburg Archipelago

While there are seal safaris, fishing, and island hopping tours available for visitors to explore this beautiful archipelago just an hour from Gothenburg, kayaking is arguably the best way to explore the area. There are guided tours available for all abilities, plus you can choose to add swimming or fishing to your paddling adventure.

Go To The Fish Church

Feskekôrka is a fish market with the architectural qualities of a church, hence the name! As well as drawing visitors who want to see this sublime building – an architectural experiment built in 1874, Feskekôrka is also the place to go for top quality fish and seafood that is as fresh as it gets.

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Explore The Universeum

This is Scandinavia’s largest science centre, a whopping 9,000 square metres of flora, fauna, and fun. Over seven levels there is room for a tropical rainforest, home to 25 metre tall kapok trees with a suspension bridge, a 1.4 million litre aquarium with sharks and rays, plus monkeys, sloths, and caimans to name just a few. It even has room for visitors to step into a space station.

Check Out The Parks And Gardens

Gothenburg is a compact city, which makes it easy to pass from one splendid public garden to another. The Botanical Garden is one of the largest in Europe, and close by is Slottsskogen, the main park in Gothenburg. Just outside of the city you’ll find historic estates with impressive garden spaces, open for the public to enjoy. Don’t forget that in Sweden there is a right to roam, so visitors can go and explore any open space, as long as they pay attention to the “do not disturb or destroy” policy that comes with it.

Visit Gothenburg Museum of Art

It just won the title Museum of the Year in Sweden thanks to its diverse art collection. So as well as being able to view Rubens, Munch, Picasso et al, visitors can expect a variety of workshops, temporary exhibitions and lectures over the three floors of this stunning museum.

Popular Destinations Capping Tourist Numbers

Cheap travel is more accessible than ever, couple that with Airbnb maximising the number of places to stay and it is a recipe for disaster as far as locals are concerned. While tourism can help boost the economy it appears that there is a tipping point when the locals themselves can no longer afford to stay, or enjoy the life they once led. Here are a few popular destinations that are capping their tourist numbers, and why they have chosen to.

Barcelona

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Last year 32 million people visited Barcelona, vastly outnumbering – and irritating – the 1.5 million permanent residents. It isn’t just the drunk and disorderly antics that are causing concern, it is also the rise in apartment bookings, leading to rent hikes which many Barcelonans cannot afford. The fury of the locals has resulted in anti-tourist graffiti, and residents storming the beach area and holding protests along Las Ramblas.

To combat the rise in visitors, and to keep the residents happy, the authorities have introduced a special plan for tourist accommodation. This will limit the number of new hotels spaces (currently at 75,000 beds) that can be introduced, and limit the number of tourist apartments. The latter may be more difficult however as authorities estimate that half of the 100,000 beds available to rent in apartments are actually illegal ones.

Dubrovnik

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This beautiful city’s World Heritage Site status is at risk due to extreme overcrowding by tourists. UNESCO requested numbers within the medieval city’s walls to be capped at 8,000 visitors a day after peak times saw in excess of 10,000 people cramming the ramparts. As with Barcelona, such crowding has led to disgruntled locals who have chosen to protest.

Plans put in place include limiting the number of cruise ships that can arrive at the port at any one time, and lowering the limit of visitors to the medieval city even further than UNESCO recommendations to just 4,000 per day. While the Mayor acknowledges that this could see a reduction in revenue to the tune of a million Euros over two years, it should improve the happiness of Dubrovnik’s residents, and also enable the city to retain its World Heritage status.

Mont Blanc

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Overcrowding is becoming such a danger that France recently issued a cap on the number of visitors to the Royal Route of Mont Blanc. While this cap is only temporary, it is something that may come in to play regularly in the future.

The reason for the restriction on numbers is safety and pollution. There are more people than ever attempting the summit, many of whom do not have enough experience, which has led to deaths. There is also the issue of pollution from overcrowding – especially as the shelter at the summit, the Gouter, is frequently exceeding its 120-person capacity. The recent cap was in place for 8 days, and only permitted experienced climbers who already had permits to access the summit.

Santorini

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Two million visitors a year isn’t helping preserve the charm of this idyllic destination, especially when close to half the number of visitors are cruise liner day-trippers adding very little to the local economy.

To combat the impact the Mayor has imposed a limit of just 8,000 tourists per day, but some fear that the overcrowding is also due to a rise in the number of residents. As more tourists arrive on this Greek Island, more people come here to live and work – but the infrastructure isn’t there to support the fastest-rising population in Greece, creating much discontent.

Maya Bay

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For four months this year the idyllic Maya Bay in Thailand is closed to ALL tourists. This has been enforced to allow the surrounding reefs to recover from the impact of 5,000 people a day seeking paradise.

The huge numbers of visitors are down to the success of The Beach, a film about an untouched backpacker paradise. Back then, this bay really was an unspoilt gem, but today it is a far cry from the image in the film. Temporary beach and bay closures has worked well in other Thailand beauty spots, but ideally a permanent closure is what is needed in extreme cases – which has an obvious impact on the much-needed tourist revenue for locals. One compromise could be to have a daily cap on visitors once Maya Bay opens again in September, or at least closing the bay to sightseeing boats, one of the biggest polluters in this part of the world.

Things To Do In Russia Instead Of Watching The World Cup

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With World Cup fever in full swing we thought we’d share some interesting things to do in each location of the tournament. Great for a bit of sightseeing before or after a match, or as a way to escape the footballing throngs!

Nizhny Novgorod

The Chkalov Stairs is a monumental flight of steps – 560 in total – in the centre of Nizhny Novgorod. The steps have been built in a figure of eight shape, and connect Minin and Pozharsky Square, the Upper Volga and the Lower Volga embankments, and offer spectacular views of the surrounding area. This is the place to go to chill out and take in the views, for locals as well as visitors to the area.

Kazan

Kaban Lakes is a huge body of water rife with rumour of treasure! According to legend, this lake has hidden gold, looting by troops of Ivan the Terrible, that once belonged to Khan’s Queen Syuyumbike. Treasure aside, visitors will be blessed with beautiful views of sweeping cityscapes that are great from the shore, and even more impressive if you take a tour on a paddleboat.

Samara

Stalin’s Bunker is a top attraction in this city, and while Stalin was never actually here, it is packed full of everything that would have been required had he needed to come. Top tips for visiting include to wear comfy shoes, as this attraction is either 8 or 16 floors below ground (depending on your sources), and also brush up on your Russian as there is no English version of the guided tour. There is an excellent bar and restaurant at the facility where you can get your strength after burning all those calories on steps!

Sochi

Mount Akhun is the highest point in Sochi. Follow the long and winding road to the top and you’ll reach an observation tower that delivers breath-taking views of the Black Sea and surrounding forests as well as the Matsesta and Khosta rivers, which flank the mountain. Top tip is to go on a clear day, otherwise all you’ll see from the tower is fog.

St Petersburg

There is so much to see here that it is recommended that you jump aboard a tour. These will give you a fly-by experience of Russian Imperial palaces, the Peterhof Fountain Park, the Hermitage Museum and includes a canal cruise through the ‘Venice of the North’. For an added dose of Russian culture, get tickets to see a ballet.

Moscow

St Basil’s Cathedral is the number one attraction in Moscow. It was built by Ivan the Terrible in the 16thCentury, and borders the second must-do thing in Moscow, Red Square. The Cathedral is a colourful architectural delight, featuring nine separate chapels, each with a unique design and capped with its own individually shaped and coloured dome. Fun fact – it wasn’t always this colourful, it was once white to match the Kremlin, with the domes painted gold. The colours began to be added in the 17thCentury to reflect the colours that described the Kingdom of Heaven in the Book of Revelation.

The Worst Holiday Destinations In The World To Visit in June

Ever planned a badly-timed break? Spent your Round The World Trip visiting every destination in the wrong season? If you are thinking of a last-minute getaway this month, you’ll do well to avoid the following locations!

Dubai, UAE

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In June in Dubai it is really really hot, and really really humid, which makes really really hot feel like a bath in a volcano. Basically the seasonal high of 40°C combined with 58% humidity makes it feel like a searing 59°C! That is hotter than the hottest place on earth! If you must go, stick to indoor activities – thankfully quite easy due to the many luxury shopping malls and the world’s largest aquarium.

The Everglades, Florida

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June marks the start of several seasons in the Everglades – The Wet Season, The Hurricane Season and the Mosquito Season, not the most sought after combination on anyone’s travel itinerary! Plus the thunderstorms at this time of year can last for hours, so you’ll find yourself hiding for cover most of the time. FYI, the best months to visit are December to April.

Havana, Cuba

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Hot, wet and very very windy. June in Havana marks the start of the Hurricane Season, and the stats say it will rain on average for half the month. We all know that wind and rain are the number one enemies of enjoying a Cuban cigar, so save your trip for another time, ideally between December and May.

Death Valley National Park, California

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This destination holds the impressive Highest Recorded Temperature In The World title, and guess when it was recorded? Yup, June – a whopping 56.7°C! The previous record of 58°Crecorded atEl Azizia, Libya, and held for around 90 years, was deemed to be inaccurate by as much as 7°C because the measurement was taken over tarmac, not a true representation of the desert terrain.

Don’t forget your travel insurance! A well-chosen policy can help you out when Mother Nature decides to scupper your travel plans. Bad weather can mean cancelled flights, long delays, and in extreme cases the need for replaced belongings and even repatriation! Speak to our travel insurance advisors to make sure you’ve got the cover you reallyneed for your next break!

 

Self-Indulgent Dads Go To Iceland For Fathers Day

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The pressures of parental responsibility should be rewarded with at least a long weekend of awesome activities, right? Well Iceland is the destination of choice for adrenaline junkies, and just close enough for a whirlwind weekend break – perfect for Father’s Day!

Dog Sledding

An awesome activity that won’t take up much of your day, but will definitely get the adrenaline pumping! The great thing about booking a sledding experience is that while it is weather dependent, it can be done in snowy, and non-snowy conditions.

Where: Most tour pickups are from Reykjavík.

Ice Caving

The most popular ice cave experience happens in Vatnajökull, but only during wintertime. So, this time of year, the best option is to head to the Kötlujökull glacier to experience a beautiful ice cave with blue/black walls sat atop a volcano! While this sounds a James Bond experience of a lifetime, the tour is labelled as easy.

Where: Katla,Kötlujökull

Ice Climbing

This activity is available all year round, and suitable for both beginners and experienced climbers. It can be a long day out on an Ice Climbing tour, around 10 hours, but only 4 or so of that will be spent scaling an incredible glacier!  The beauty of going this time of year is that you’ll get to see a couple of fabulous waterfalls on your journey!

Where: Sólheimajökull in South Iceland

Paragliding

Adrenaline junkies who have a passion for being airborne will love the many summer paragliding tours available. Tours on the south coast are particularly popular, delivering unforgettable birds-eye views of unique landscapes such as black sand beaches, basalt stacks, ocean waves, lunar lava fields, waterfalls, and glaciers.

Where: South Coast, Iceland.

Skiing in The Midnight Sun

In North Iceland the ski season runs until the end of June, which gives the lucky visitor a chance to ski in the midnight sun! Gentle slopes and the lack of trees make it the perfect place for a beginner. There are 7 ski areas, most of which can be found in the Sauðárkrókur-Tindastóll ski area.

Where: Sauðárkrókur-Tindastóll,North Iceland

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Scuba Diving In Hot Springs

Ok, so you have to be a bit of a pro to take this on, but it is an incredible experience only available in the summer months. Scuba Diving into a hydrothermal vent has been likened to diving into an earthquake. Apparently the air bubbles coming out of the vent create a pressure so intense it makes the rocks vibrate, a sensation which the divers feel deep in their bones!

Where: Lake Kleifarvatn

Trekking, Hiking and Mountain Biking

June is the perfect time to take to the many varied landscapes of Iceland on foot, or on two wheels.  Tours can take in beaches, hot springs, mountains, valleys, glaciers, waterfalls – you name it. And because the sun doesn’t set at this time of year, you’ll feel like you have all the time in the world to explore.

Where:Anywhere and everywhere in Iceland!

White Water Rafting and Whale Watching

Because the two go hand-in-hand right? Well, they do in Iceland! This tour starts in Reykjavik’s old harbour, goes out to sea to see the wildlife then back up the Hvita River for a white-knuckle white water rafting adventure. If that wasn’t enough, tour guides encourage a leap into the glacial waters before a warming sauna and hot choc experience. Just what you’ll need after 11 hours of aquatic activities!

Where: Reykjavik

Don’t forget your travel insurance! We cover a huge range of activities and sports as standard, and even more can be added to your policy if you need!

Things To Do In Turkey For Adrenaline Junkies

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Calling all thrill-seekers! If you are looking for high octane adventures on your next holiday, you’d do well to take a look at what Turkey has to offer. Here is our pick of the best adrenaline-fuelled touristy things to do at this amazing destination!

Paragliding– The place of choice is Babadag Mountain, one of the highest take-off sites in the world! On your flight you’ll get beautiful views across Fethiye, and come to land on the gorgeous Oludeniz beach.

Skydiving– Take to the skies over the ancient city of Ephesus, and you are guaranteed a VIP view not many other tourists dare attempt! The local tour operator also offers solo dives, and microlight experiences which give extra awesome views of Virgin Mary House, Pamucak Beach, and Kusadasi Yacht Marina.

Scuba Diving At Night– Bodrum is known for having a stunning coastline, but it’s what’s in the water that attracts the adventurous. Book yourself on a scuba dive to the Graveyard of Ships, at night-time, to really get your pulse racing!

Hot Air Ballooning– Cappadocia is the place to go, with its ethereal lunar-like landscape and super-surreal light. Flights depart at dawn, and you’ll be guaranteed a rush of silent wonder as you float over arguably the most “other worldly” landscape on the planet.

White Water Rafting– Köprülü Kanyon is the place to be, even if you are a beginner. Starting at nearby Antalya, you’ll paddle your way with comparative ease through the Taurus Mountains to where the rapids begin in the heart of the national park. Here you’ll suit up ready for white water action, and enjoy every inch of the eight and a half mile rapids!

Rock Climbing– The place to be is Geyikbayiri! There are over 850 routes across all grades with both north and south facing crags, but what really draws climbers from abroad are the routes through the cave systems, impressive routes that offer something different to other destinations.

Don’t forget your travel insurance!

We offer bespoke travel insurance to suit your level of adventure. So whether you plan to jump out of a plane, off a mountain, or into the sea, we’ve got you covered. Check out the list of activities we cover here or call us on 01982 833338.

Things To Do For Free In Amsterdam

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If you are a thrifty traveller, you’ll love finding free things to do on holiday. Here are some of the best things to do for free in Amsterdam!

Visit the floating flower market on Singel Canal – There are loads of open-air markets around the city, but this is probably the most extraordinary because it is actually floating on the canal!

Take a walking tour – There are free audio tours available to download, or if you can spare a tip book yourself on the Sandemands Free Walking Tours.

Watch some open air theatre – All of Amsterdam’s parks and gardens are free to enter, but head to the Vondlepark at the right time and you could watch a play, performance or even a festival all for free.

Catch a concert – This city is very fond of culture so it should come as no surprise that you can get free entry to a classical or jazz concert somewhere in Amsterdam nearly every day of the week. Check local listings and larger establishments like The National Opera and Ballet, and The Royal Concertgebouw.

Take a river tour – Believe it or not, there is free public transport by boat in Amsterdam. The free ferries are behind Central Station and have three routes crossing the IJ River.

Go to the beach – Even though Amsterdam isn’t on the coast, there are three beaches that can be enjoyed for free. Head to Blijburg, Muiderlaan 1001 Amsterdam if you want to swim too.

Take a tour of the Diamond Factory – There are free tours that share the history of Amsterdam’s reputation as the City of Diamonds, as well as everything you need to know about the sparklers themselves.

Go to Cannabis College – This is a not-for-profit establishment in the city that aims to educate visitors about Cannabis, including the medicinal benefits. Entry is free, but if you want to experience the indoor garden, a paradise of fully-flowering organic cannabis plants, you’ll have to pay a small fee.

UK Spring Break – Countryside or Coast?

Can’t decide how to spend that extended bank holiday weekend? Here are some top spots in the countryside and on the coast to help you make up your mind!

Countryside

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Snowdonia National Park

This area is blessed with a hugely varied landscape of valleys and mountains, river gorges, lakes and waterfalls, so you can imagine the wealth of activities that come with this! As well as the usual suite of outdoor activities there are 150 attractions packed in too. Late spring and early summer are the driest times here, so perfect for the spring bank holiday break.

The Lake District

As the home of British mountaineering, and with the highest concentration of outdoor activity centres than anywhere else in the UK, you can be assured that the Lake District will deliver a fabulous slice of outdoor life. The area combines lakes, rivers, fells, woodland and small towns, so you’ll be spoilt for choice deciding what to see and do.

The Cairngorms

This is the largest National Park in the UK, is home to over a quarter of Scotland’s native forest, and the high plateaux are more like the landscape you’d find in Greenland! The Cairngorms is an inspirational place where visitors can connect with nature, but be warned it’s not the place to go if you want to get warm – temperatures are unlikely to rise above 8 °C in May.

New Forest

While these ancient woodlands are a tamer option than mountainous regions, it is still blessed with wonderful wildlife, and lots of opportunities for embracing the great outdoors. Highlights include miles upon miles of cycle tracks and forest footpaths, all of which have cattle and horses wandering freely around. It is the ideal location to set up camp, but if roughing it in a field isn’t your idea of fun, you’ll love the many quintessentially English villages nestled amongst the glades and moors!

Give your getaway an upgrade and hire a car for your journey!

Whether it is a super car, campervan or SUV that you’ve got your sights set on, make sure you get Car Hire Excess Insurance so you are not left with the bill if the vehicle is damaged or stolen.

Coast

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Sanna

If you are looking for a remote coastal experience, Sanna Bay is a must. There is very little here but white sandy beaches, turquoise seas and spectacular sand dunes. In fact, you’d be mistaken for thinking you are on a tropical beach. Apart from the temperature of course! The drive to Sanna is also extraordinary, a single track road through what has been described as some of Scotland’s oddest scenery – it is in fact the crater of an extinct volcano.

Lulworth Cove

If you are looking for warmth, your best bet for the Spring Bank Holiday Break is to head to the south coast, Dorset in particular. The Jurassic coast is said to have more hours of sunshine and be warmer than anywhere else in the UK. Lulworth Cove, and further down the coast at Durdle Door you will find shelter from cold northerly breezes whilst being blessed with sunny blue skies. This area also has spectacular coastlines, far-flung views, and wonderful beaches where you may find a fossil or two.

Southwold

The mix of sand dunes, marshlands, and sensationally genteel historic town is just gorgeous. Add to that the fact it has it’s own brewery, and you’ll see why Southwold is a go-to for a wonderful long weekend! As well as delightful scenery, first class eateries and up-market shopping opportunities, Southwold also lays claim to having the quirkiest pier in England, a nice nod to the many artists that have been drawn here, and of course reside here.

Swansea Bay

This is billed as the best beach in Wales – a vast sandy stretch of coast hugged by gently sloping hills. From the top of these hills you can see the Pembrokeshire coast, and a wealth of natural wonders. This is a great place to catch some gentle surf, which might be tempting as the temperature is creeping up at this time of year, or relax in natural surroundings – but it will also appeal to those of you who like to be near the hustle and bustle of city life too!

Chocolate Themed Breaks – An Alternative Easter Treat

Why have a chocolate egg when you can have a chocolate holiday! Here are four choice ways to have an eggstra indulgent Easter!

© Image Courtesy of Jade Mountain.

Chocolate Alchemy, Jade Mountain Spa Hotel, St Lucia 

This luxury hotel bathes in the glory of Piti and Gros Piton mountains, floating upon the Caribbean Sea, and rather indulgently is set in an estate where there are over 2000 cocoa trees growing! This makes Jade Mountain the place to go for an ultra indulgent chocolate experience!

In the Chocolate Lab guests can taste and help make the estate’s very own Emerald Estate Chocolate. Chocolate infused activities include sensory tastings, educational estate trips, and truffle making classes. There are also chocolate inspired dishes and cocktails in the resort restaurants and bars – plus chocolate themed spa treatments – the coarseness of ground cocoa makes for the perfect scrub, infusing the skin with natural nutrients and anti-oxidants. The Chocolate Alchemy Package Includes:

  • A chocolate welcome amenity and cocktail
  • Chocolate Lovers’ Breakfast in Bed celebration
  • Chocolate infused 1 hour spa treatment
  • A learning excursion to the resort’s Emerald Cocoa Estate
  • Chocolate Sensory tasting
  • Chocolate making class in Jade Mountain’s chocolate laboratory
  • A chance to create your own fudge and personalized chocolate bar

© Image Courtesy of Jade Mountain.

Chocolate Journey Cruise, Worldwide

Princess Cruises offers indulgent on-board chocolate experiences on all its liners, in partnership with award-winning chocolatier Norman Love. Each ship is different – but chocolate is always a key theme. Some for example do a monster Chocolate Indulgence breakfast buffet, and some boast a chocolate fountain or two. Experiences to entice guests aboard include:

  • Exquisite chocolate desserts
  • Chocolate-flavoured cocktails
  • Wine and chocolate pairing tasting sessions
  • Chocolate-themed spa treatments

 

© Image Courtesy of Cruise Critic

Mövenpick Signature Chocolate Hour, Worldwide

 This Swiss hotel chain is so connected with its heritage that it dedicates one hour in the afternoon to an exquisite chocolate tasting experience!

Mövenpick’s Signature Chocolate Hour takes place in the lobby of all their hotels and resorts around the world. Each day you can discover Mövenpick chocolate variations and homemade creations such as éclairs, brownies, truffles, chocolate fountains and much more!

© Image courtesy of Mövenpick.

The Chocolate Indulgence Break, Vale Resort, Wales

A complete hands-on experience in chocolate making, combined with a luxury break. The chocolate indulgence break includes:

  • 1 night luxury 4* break
  • Full Welsh breakfast
  • Vale Grill, A la Carte dinner
  • Half a day hands-on course making dipped chocolate & hand rolled truffles
  • Take home 25-30 chocolates
  • Tasting session & recipes
  • Half day in the Vale Spa with 25 minute facial or massage

© Image Courtesy of Vale Resort.