Category Archives: Travel Insurance

Best Places For Backpacking in 2019

Backpacking travel insurance Image by Pexels CC0

Image by Pexels CC0

Here are the top places to head in 2019 with a pack on your back and just enough money in your wallet for a hostel. Idyllic whether you are backpacking for gap year giggles, travelling on a budget, or you just fancied having a wholesome adventure!

Philippines

Seeking adventure? Tick! Seeking tropical beaches, with crystal clear sea? Tick! A unique honeymoon location? Tick! You’ll need to think of things to add to your bucket list after backpacking in the Philippines.

backpacking Philippines Image by my000693 CC0

Image by my000693 CC0

Made up of over 7,000 islands, you’d expect a taste of paradise, adventure and excitement and that’s exactly what you get. Go scuba diving, swim with great white sharks, indulge yourself under the tranquil waterfalls or relax with a beer by a lagoon. It’s also cheap – a pint of beer is about 75p at the going rate.

Iceland

Spectacular, rugged, breath-taking, glacial – it’s hard to describe Iceland within a limited word count. You’ll be able to honestly hashtag #nofilter when you snap the majesty that are the northern lights in all their prancing, dancing, ethereal beauty.

backpacking Iceland travel insurance Image © 43kcreative.com

Image © 43kcreative.com

Hire a car to tour the glaciers and ice fields, bathe in the geothermal springs for a unique getting back to nature experience and take in the local Reykjavik culture, with its charming Nordic nightlife. Be warned Iceland isn’t cheap, but this small island nation packs in more natural beauty per square mile and you get more than what you pay for.

Nepal

Nepal is a mountain nation. Get your head around that for a moment and think what that can offer. You don’t even have to climb a mountain (only recommended with proper guidance) to have a life changing experience in Nepal. Paraglide through the soaring valleys, take a plane ride across the Himalayas, visit temples, national parks and stunning monuments.

backpacking insurance nepal Image by Squirrel_photos CC0

Image by Squirrel_photos CC0

Nepal is a true adventure. If you do choose to trek around Everest, put at least a week aside and go off season – it gets extremely busy. If you’re after an experience that doesn’t require as much extra oxygen, take a trip to one of the national parks and observe tigers in their natural habitat.

Turkey

If you’re looking for a unique backpacking experience at a low, low cost, you can’t beat The Shoestring Cave House in the Cappadocia region. From just £7.00 a night, you can sleep in a cave, relax at the outside pool and even enjoy a ride in a hot air balloon.

backpacking turkey Image by adibalea CC0

Image by adibalea CC0

With views that are going to set your Instagram alight, balmy Turkish evenings and a once in a lifetime opportunity to sleep below the ground, this is a perfect stop off for any backpacker. Be warned, Turkey is politically unstable at the moment and this may not be the time to go. If you’re determined however, the people are some of the most charming on the planet and a joy to share a shisha pipe with.

Worldwideinsure.com Longstay Travel Insurance has been tailored to meet the needs of those on extended breaks and backpacking adventures! It has greater flexibility than standard travel insurance, and you can add activities as you go.

 

The Most Beautiful Towns in Southern France

Southern France offers glorious Mediterranean sunshine, an unrivalled peace and some of the most stunning sights and views on the planet. Here are some of the most gorgeous towns to visit or stay in the South of France.

Gordes (Vaucluse, Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur)

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A beautiful hillside town adorned with Romanesque terracotta roofs and winding narrow pathways. Head to Gordes on a Tuesday morning, when the locals open their shutters to sell the locally produced cheese and wine. Nearby is the famous Sénanque Abbey, surrounded by some of the most beautiful lavender fields, tendered by the resident monks.

Lauzerte (Occitanie, Tarn-et-Garonne)

Another hill-top treasure sitting proudly over the Occitanie countryside. During the day visit the idyllically peaceful town square featuring cafes, bars and a quirky piece of pavement art! On Thursday evening in summer, the Marchés Gourmands takes over the square for an evening of food, drink and entertainment and then take in the sunset over the nearby hills.

Carcassonne (Aude, Occitanie)

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This medieval fortress town is Europe’s largest walled city. Famed for its spires, walls and beautiful bridge, be sure to visit in the evening, when these stunning landmarks are lit up.

 

St Tropez (Var, Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur)

As famous for the St Tropez sun tan as it is as a destination for the rich and famous. Located on the French Riveria, sample the local historical landmarks, gaze up at the millionaire’s yachts, or just catch some rays on the nearby Pampelonne beach.

Saint-Rémy-de-Provence (Bouches-du-Rhône, Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur)

An absolute must for Van Gogh fans everywhere. Saint-Rémy-de-Provenceinspired his ‘Starry Night’ painting. You can visit the Monastery of Saint-Paul de Mausolé, which was once an asylum where Van Gogh was treated. Beyond the art connection, there are winding streets, elegant fountains and an abundance of cafes that you will have come to expect from this sun-drenched part of France.

Rocamadour (Occitanie, Lot)

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Imagine a fantasy French village – and Rocamador is it. Integrated into the hillside, Rocamadour is Instagram ready from every angle! For a unique experience visit the nearby monkey forest, where Barbary macaques (normally found in Gibraltar) roam freely in the woodland or Grotte Préhistorique des Merveilles, with cave art over 20,000 years old.

 

Don’t forget your travel insurance! Even if you are travelling within the EU and you have an EHIC (European Health Insurance Card) it only offers limited protection. You could still be asked to pay towards treatment, and it certainly doesn’t help if your passport gets lost or stolen!

Ten Stress-Busting Travel Tips for Your Next Holiday

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1. Keep calm and plan early. Booking a few months in advance will give you time to research the best deals without panicking that they won’t be there in half an hour.

2. Consider going by boat or train rather than going by plane. Air travel is notoriously stressful and tends to destroy all the loveliness of a holiday on the way home.

3. If you are going by air, stand behind business travellers going through security. They will have packed light, know the drill, and want to be the other side of security swiftly.

4. Do not stand behind families going through security. Lots of stuff, lots of directing children to do the right thing – you could find yourself getting impatient.

5. Sort your home out so it’s nice to come back to. The stress of getting back to reality after an idyllic break will be less if you come back to somewhere clean, tidy, and with food in the cupboards.

6. Use a packing app. You can create multiple lists for all types of trip and some even have templates based on climate, weather, activities and reasons for travelling.

7. Always leave for your destination with PLENTY of time, especially if you are flying. Airport hotels are a wonderful resource for busting “Ahhhhh, I hope I don’t miss my flight!” stress.

8. Embrace a chance to relax. Sitting around and waiting while travelling is inevitable. Rather than getting impatient, get stuck into a book, sketch your surroundings or take some time to journal.

9. Get travel insurance. Should something go wrong – such as losing your luggage, getting your passport stolen, or finding that your airline has gone bust – trying to sort it out without the help of travel insurance is extremely stressful and potentially very expensive.

10. Eat well and stay hydrated! Getting hangry is a real thing, and when you are flitting between time zones or travelling at crazy hours your routine can take a battering. Eating fresh food and drinking plenty is essential.

Insider Secrets: Cruise Liners – Travel Tips from the Experts

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Want to get more bang for your buck on a cruise? Here are our favourite tips for saving money, making the most of hospitality services, and planning where and when to spend your holiday cash on board. We’ve even thrown in some insider insight extras about what it’s really like on a cruise ship!

 

  1. You don’t have to stick to one starter, one main, and one desert in the main dining hall – passengers are free to order whatever dishes they wish from each of the menus, and as much as they want! Nice if you prefer a few starters and a desert over a main meal, or just can’t make your mind up between dishes!

 

  1. Meals in the main dining area are usually planned in advance – ask if you can see the upcoming menu so you know which night you’d rather book a table at one of the other on-board restaurants.

 

  1. Don’t like what’s on the menu? Ask if a different dish is available – ordering off-menu is even possible in the main dining hall.

 

  1. Thrifty travellers will be pleased to know that some cruise liners don’t mind passengers bringing a couple of bottles of wine or champagne on board (although you will have to pay corkage if you plan to have it in an on-board restaurant). There is also a reasonable allowance for non-alcoholic drinks – which can end up saving a few precious pounds.

 

  1. If sea-sickness strikes, room service is usually on hand to help out, no need to try and get to the on-board pharmacy, just give them a call and they’ll come to your room with required remedies. If your cabin is on a higher deck however, you might find you feel less queasy if you head to the middle of a lower deck, where there is less movement.

 

  1. Room service is free on most cruise ships! Bear in mind that this unexpected luxury upgrade may result in a surcharge on food prices at certain times of night, and the person bringing the food will probably be expecting a tip.

 

  1. Talking of tips, the hospitality crew are generally low-paid, and earn their living by delivering a great service rewarded by tips. As such, make sure you pack plenty of “change” suitable for tipping staff.

 

  1. Missed out on free tickets for the big show? Head on down anyway, lots of people who reserve these tickets decide not to go – if there are any seats spare at show time, staff will happily let you in.

 

  1. Pack your own power board – cabins are well known for being sparse when it comes to power outlets, so bring your own power board to make sure you stay charged for the trip.

 

  1. Pick your passes and packages carefully. Whether it is a spa pass, drinks package, or restaurant package – work out what is really included for the price and whether it’s cost effective for what you will actually use. Drinks packages, for example, might mean you have to drink 10 drinks a day, every day of your cruise, even on port days to get value for money.

 

  1. Bear in mind that there are plenty of opportunities on-board for freebies – free pastries with coffee, free soft-serve ice-cream points, complimentary drinks at on-board events, and deals on buying a whole bottle of wine (which will be labelled and saved for you for later). If cheap alcohol is what you are after, get your fill in port before you head back to the ship.

 

  1. Cruise ship insurance is essential – not only will it help you out if you get sick on-board, but should you happen to miss departure (a real risk if you embark on your own port excursions), it could stop your holiday turning into a total disaster! Be warned that buying insurance from the cruise line generally costs more for lower cover – you are better buying from a third-party provider.

 

  1. Somewhere on the ship there is a morgue! Statistics dictate that out of the thousands of passengers who travel on cruise ships 365 days a year, someone will shift their mortal coil during a trip.

 

  1. If you like your privacy… the general rule of thumb is that the lower the deck and the further back on the ship you go, the fewer people will be around.

How To Stay Stylish On A Longstay Adventure

Insider tips on what to pack, and how to wear it, to make sure you don’t look like you’re living out of a backpack on your next longstay adventure.

Image by LUM3N CC0

  • Choose clothes that are resistant to creasing.
  • Go for dark clothes that are more forgiving when it comes to signs of wear and stains.
  • Resist packing clothes with bold patterns, they are harder to mix and match. Keep the patterns to key pieces, or accessories.
  • Roll your clothes when you pack – not only will it minimise creasing but also you’ll be able to get more items in your backpack!
  • Get a day bag that is on-trend. Just one simple stylish accessory that you can take out day or night while you leave your backpack safely at a hostel or hotel, will make a world of difference to your style status!
  • Pack some accessories that are designed to “transform” an outfit – or even better, pick up key pieces during your travels.
  • Keep comfort in mind – you’ll be clocking up a lot of hours on planes, trains, and buses so comfort is key to your happiness.

PROFESSIONAL STYLIST ADVICE FOR THE LADIES: “Packing can be really tough when you plan to be away for some time, because you don’t want to end up looking scruffy and letting your style down, just because you’re living out of a suitcase/backpack.

My top tip would be to pack a good amount of staple dresses because unlike other wardrobe items, dresses can be styled up and down. You can pair a dress with a cropped jumper and tights for when the weather is a little chilly, or opt for bare legs when the sun is out.”Katie Derrick, of bespoke luxury travel agent AfricaTravel.com.

“Choose clothing that’s versatile, imagine what you’re packing to work as your very own capsule wardrobe. Choose dresses that work both as a dress, and as a skirt, by layering and tying a t-shirt or light-weight knit over the top. Choosing pieces that can be styled in different ways is the easiest way to ensure you aren’t sick of your clothes a week into your trip!” Stylist at Elvi.com

Jumpsuit – it’s great for countries where a conservative look is a must for ladies and it can easily be dressed up or down making it a versatile item in your backpack!

Leggings – Wear on their own or under a dress, or even under shorts – versatile, comfortable, and easy to wear.

Dresses – slip dresses that can be worn with a t-shirt underneath or jumper over the top, are ideal – easily taking your look from day to night with ease. Don’t forget the LBD, easy to wear and can be dressed up for any occasion!

Vests and tees – they take up very little room, are great for layering and can be worn with jumpsuits, dresses, leggings, trousers or shorts.

Flat shoes – ones that you are happy to walk all day in that will also cut the mustard if you decide to treat yourself to a fine dining experience.

Sarong – the holy grail of accessories. Did you know there are at least 30 ways you could use a sarong? It can be a dress, a bag, a skirt, a shawl… pick a classy print and you are done!

PROFESSIONAL STYLIST ADVICE FOR THE GENTS: “Venturing away on a long trip requires packing sensibly, but that shouldn’t mean compromising on fashion. Be sure to pack a practical, stylish and foldable jacket, so that you can prepare for all weather forecasts, while also still looking the part. Pack miniature grooming products, too, including mini shaving foam, scented body wash and moisturiser, to keep you smelling good, as well as looking good during your travels.” Steve Pritchard, of men’s fashion retailer Ben Sherman.

Wondering what such a wonderfully useful jacket could be like? Well,

the classic Ben Sherman Four Pocket Jacket is just the ticket. It’s smart-casual, and it exudes style and class; it’s waterproof, and leaves enough room to layer up with warm and stylish jumpers and t-shirts – essential when venturing somewhere new and travelling to countries with varying weather and climates in one trip.

Don’t forget your travel insurance! Longstay insurance for backpackers from worldwideinsure.com can cover from 3 to 18 months, and it can be renewed if you are still travelling when your policy is coming to an end. Plus, if you have already left home without travel insurance, we can cover that too.

Please note, policies, terms and conditions may change – all information published in this blog pertaining to travel insurance from worldwideinsure.com is only deemed valid at the time of publication.

 

A Gluten-Free Holiday Guide – Advice For Coeliacs

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If you have to watch what you eat for health reasons, going on holiday can throw up a whole host of food-related challenges. This month we are focussed on sharing helpful information for those who can’t eat gluten.

Get location specific advice

Coeliac.org.uk has some excellent country-specific information sheets to help gluten-free holidaymakers ensure their food is safe to eat. This includes information about the cuisine, local coeliac groups and useful phrases you can show to those in charge of your food. For example, when visiting Vietnam:

I suffer from an illness called coeliac disease and have to follow a strict gluten-free diet, or I may become very unwell.
Tôi bị một căn bệnh gọi là bệnh celiac và phải
tuân theo một chế độ ăn không có gluten chặt chẽ, nếu không tôi có thể trở nên rất khó chịu trong người.

Make your dietary needs clear when booking EVERYTHING

Whether it is your flight, a hotel, or a restaurant, state your needs clearly when booking. This not only gives your host more time to ensure your needs can be met, but will also mean you are more likely to get a decent gluten-free meal.

Double check your dietary needs have been understood when you arrive

Remind the person that you booked with that you are the gluten-free individual, or ask to speak to the chef to make sure that your needs have been taken seriously and that you will be served food that won’t make you ill.

Pack essential foods

Things don’t always go to plan, so pack bare essentials you know you can eat. Take your own gluten-free breads and pastas for example, not just snacks. There aren’t many establishments that will deny someone breaking out their own gluten-free bread roll if they aren’t able to cater for their needs.

But do check that you can take them into the country!

Some countries have strict policies on what foods can be brought in. Check with your airline, and also ask your GP to write a cover letter explaining the importance of these foods for your health.

Go to Italy – it is a top gluten-free destination!

Ok, so this is the home of pasta and pizza dishes, so how can it be so good for those who need to avoid gluten? Well, there was a national coeliac screening programme that raised awareness of coeliac disease, and in turn educated a whole country on the importance of gluten-free menus and preparation areas. The Italian Coeliac Society, understanding that gluten based foods are a staple in every Italian household then set about publishing a list of eateries and B&Bs in the country that are certified gluten-free.

Talk to your travel insurance provider

As a coeliac, you must make sure that you tell your travel insurance provider about your condition. As a general rule a customer with a medical condition (or several) can declare their recent medical history and current situation and if the condition is stable and well controlled, not awaiting investigation or treatment, for example surgery, then the condition can be covered.

At Worldwideinsure.com for a condition such as Coeliac, we are able to cover customers with a stable condition, including those with Stomas, provided they haven’t had an unplanned hospital admission in the last 6 months.

For more information please see Travel Insurance Medical Conditions.

Choose self-catering

If you can’t trust what other people might serve you, then you can ease the stress and opt to cook up your own gluten-free cuisine on a self-catering basis. While you’ll have to be patient and shop carefully for ingredients, it is a great way to learn a few new words. Life is made a bit easier if you are holidaying in the EU, as the packaging has to have the same labelling information that we are used to in the UK, where allergens are written in bold.

Opt for a resort

Resorts are more likely to cater for a variety of dietary needs, and are more likely to be familiar with the seriousness of cross-contamination. Another bonus is that they are also more likely to have nutrition sheets where every dish has its ingredients explained in minute detail.

 

*** Please Note ***

Policies, terms and conditions may change – all information published in this blog pertaining to travel insurance from worldwideinsure.com is only deemed valid at the time of publication.

12 Travel Photography Tips You Don’t Want To Miss

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Want to take some Nat-Geo worthy snaps on your next trip? Take a look at these top tips, guaranteed to improve your travel shots!

  1. Get up early. Sunrise is an awesome time, take the time to capture it in your location. An early start also gives you a better chance for capturing well-known landmarks without the masses.
  2. Stay out late. Long exposures of city lights, or of the stars at night sweeping by. Staying up late might also reveal a more decadent side to your destination!
  3. Use a tripod. It’ll give you time to set up your shot, and wait for the ideal light, or opportunity to take a remarkable shot.
  4. Shoot from the hip. A unique perspective, and a fun way to get some candid shots.
  5. Plan an itinerary. Don’t kick yourself for missing a photo opportunity, make a comprehensive list of locations you’d like to shoot.
  6. Let yourself get lost. Some of the best photos come from adventure. See where your journey takes you, there could be untold surprises in store.
  7. Recap the rules of composition. The rule of thirds in particular, it is a fast-track way to get a well-balanced shot.
  8. Try out some unusual framing. Break the composition rules and you may well get a dream shot that no-one else discovered.
  9. Learn to use your manual settings. Adjusting the shutter speed and light levels yourself can lead to a signature style that no one else can steal.
  10. Let yourself free with auto. Even the most basic of cameras nowadays are capable of awesome imagery – let your equipment do the hard work.
  11. Backup your image library. The last thing you want is to lose your pictures – keep them backed up!
  12. Make sure your equipment is covered with travel insurance. You also won’t want to lose your camera. Make sure that any equipment you take on your travels is covered on your insurance policy.

Gap Year Travel Insurance – What You Need To Know

Going on a gap year adventure after sitting your final exams is the epitome of freedom – but you must make sure you get your travel insurance in order before you go. This is what you need to know…

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Travel Insurance is the most important purchase you will make.

Paying for medical help overseas can run into hundreds of thousands of pounds – money that you (or your parents) will have to find if you don’t have travel insurance – or if you have inadequate travel insurance. Remember, you may be refused medical treatment if you can’t prove how you will cover those costs!

Don’t rely on EHIC cards.

The European Health insurance Card has limited use. The validity of the card varies from country to country, and only entitles the holder to access the same level of care as a resident of that country. Unlike the UK, most EU countries require insurance to cover the excess costs of medical treatment – which you will be liable to pay too even if you have an EHIC. Travel insurance is designed to help recover those costs.

Losing your passport is more expensive (and time consuming) than you might think.

Emergency Travel Documents (ETDs) cost £100, they can take several days to obtain, and you will need to find the money to get to and from your nearest British consulate or embassy. On top of this you may need to arrange for a police report and get passport photos done. Don’t forget that you may also have to pay to replace any visas too AND you will need to get your passport replaced – which can cost in the region of £200 from overseas! As if that wasn’t enough to ruin a perfectly good adventure expenses can spiral if you need to rearrange holiday plans. This is why the gov.uk website recommends that travellers take out comprehensive travel insurance. Travel insurance is there to help recoup the costs involved in replacing lost or stolen belongings, including passports

Look for a policy that allows you to extend cover while you are already travelling.

You are about to go on the biggest adventure of your life, and who knows where it might take you! The last thing you’d want is to have to come home because your travel insurance says you have to. Many travel insurance policies require that you get back home within a year, or return to the UK to extend it. We offer longstay backpacker insurance that can be extended even while you are still travelling so you can go where your wanderlust takes you!

These are the sorts of things that travel insurance can help with:

  • Cancelled flights.
  • Lost or stolen luggage.
  • Medical help.
  • Emergency medical care and repatriation.
  • Lost or stolen passport.
  • Lost or stolen bank cards and holiday money.
  • If your operator goes bankrupt.
  • If you need to cancel your trip due to illness.
  • If your trip is disrupted due to natural disasters or terrorism.

Travel Insurance can also cover you if you are the one to cause damage or injury!

If you are involved in an incident that causes injury to another person, or damage to property you run the risk of being sued. Comprehensive travel insurance can minimise the cost to you, including the cost of legal proceedings.

To arrange Gap Year Travel Insurance, for yourself or your child, get in touch with us on 01892 833338.

 

The Most Common Snowboarding Injuries (And How To Avoid Them)

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Image courtesy of Ossurwebshop.co.uk

Snowboarding is often seen as skiing’s younger, cooler and more daring counterpart. It began in the 1960s, when engineer Sherman Poppen fastened two skis together to help his daughter learn to ski, and was soon taken up and developed by skateboarding enthusiasts and winter sport fanatics alike.

Today, snowboarding is hugely popular around the world and is a recognised Olympic sport. It is also a high-risk sport – you are after all hurtling down snowy slopes. Safety gear and common sense can go a long way to preventing or minimising injury, but accidents are always going to happen at some stage.

The kind of injuries common in snowboarding are different to the injuries you’d expect when skiing – this is largely due to the differences in equipment. Skiing is notorious for leg injuries, whereas with snowboarding, you are more likely to incur an upper body injury. In fact…

The most frequent snowboarding injuries are to the wrist

Beginner snowboarders fall a lot, and they need to learn not to try and break the fall with their wrist (which is a natural thing to do). Also, beginners often don’t bother with professional instruction and this can mean learning to fall the hard way. Experienced snowboarders know that!

In addition to wrist injuries, falling onto an outstretched hand can transmit the force along the arm and cause a shoulder or elbow injury. Around 60% of snowboarding injuries are to the arm, wrist, hand or thumb.

Wrist injuries can be serious

A complicated wrist fracture can increase the chances of osteoarthritis and long-term disability. It generally takes up to eight weeks for a broken wrist to heal, but it can take much longer. This can be really frustrating, as being unable to fully use your arm and hand while you wait to heal can really curtail your everyday activities. If you don’t allow your injury time to heal, however, you can cause permanent damage.

How To Avoid A Wrist Injury

Wrist injuries can be avoided by proper safety gear. Wrist guards for snowboarders are widely available and also affordable.

Head injuries are common too

Injuries to the head and face are also more common among snowboarders than among skiers. In fact, the risk for head injury among snowboarders is nearly twice that for skiers. Head injuries can be caused by a fall or by a collision. Beginners especially can fall backwards and hit the back of their head, or occiput. Snowboarders can fall forwards or backwards more easily than skiers in their fixed bindings.

Head injuries are thankfully rarely serious

But when they are serious, they can be tragic. Death or permanent brain injury can result from a fall or a collision, and that is why helmets cannot be recommended highly enough. It’s difficult to estimate the recovery time for a head injury. Cuts, bruises and broken noses will usually heal quite quickly, but concussion can have lasting consequences, and other serious head injuries even more so.

How To Avoid A Head Injury

Wear a helmet. While they won’t make you invincible, they can protect against a more serious injury.

Spinal Injuries

Like head injuries, spinal injuries are more common among snowboarders than among skiers, but still thankfully very rare. The two most common causes are a jump that goes disastrously wrong, with the jumper landing in an awkward position, or a really violent backward fall where the force of the fall is transmitted to the spine. It’s hard to estimate the recovery time from a spinal injury, as they vary in severity so wildly, but the damage can be permanent and disabling

How To Avoid a Spinal Injury

Jumps are the second most common cause of snowboarding injuries, after falls. The best way to avoid a spinal injury is not to attempt a jump or trick that is way beyond your skill level.

Knee Injuries Account For 16% of Snowboarding Injuries

Knee injuries are much less common among snowboarders than among skiers. Harder boots give a higher chance of knee injury, although they offer more protection to the ankles. Surprisingly, nasty knee injuries to snowboarders take place on ski lifts as well as on ski slopes. Getting onto a lift involves having one foot fastened into the board and pushing with the other, so the possibility of a sprain is quite high. Twisting causes a big number of knee injuries among boarders.

Collisions are more likely to cause knee fractures, and twisting injuries to cause ligament damage or strains to the knee

Damage to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the most common form of ligament injury, with 40% of all ACL injuries attributed to extreme sports. This is the same ligament which many professional footballers injure and depending on the severity can involve surgery and around nine months on the side-lines, not to mention a weaker knee and an increased risk of osteoarthritis in the future (not good).

Both ligament injuries and fractures are serious and have a long recovery time involving physical therapy and medication. Sometimes even an operation is needed, depending on the severity of the damage.

How To Avoid A Knee Injury

A well-designed knee brace is designed to offer protection, typically manufactured from materials such as carbon fibre (strong and lightweight), as well as offering stability so that you can handle the twists, turns and jumps on the slopes. Modern knee braces for extreme sports are lightweight and non-corrosive. If you can water ski wearing one, you can certainly snowboard! Protection is always better than cure and this is why many of the professionals can now be seen sporting them.

Common Ankle Injuries

Ankles are also an area to watch out for. Snowboarders are quite vulnerable to ankle sprains and fractures. In fact, a lateral fracture of the talus is referred to as “snowboarder’s ankle”, as it is rarely sustained in any other way. Soft boots are easier to walk in and make you feel more flexible, but they do leave you more open to this kind of injury.

Sprains are more common, than fractures, but it’s important to get even minor sprains treated

Sometimes a fracture can be misdiagnosed as a sprain, leading to unpleasant consequences down the line. Snowboarder’s ankle doesn’t always show up on an X-ray, so if the pain from a sprain lasts longer than six or seven days, you need to visit your doctor again and get it checked over. A simple sprain should be almost healed after about a week and should certainly be able to bear weight, even if it’s still sore or tender.

How To Avoid Ankle Injuries

Opt for harder boots, but be aware that it might make an injury to the knee more likely, and restricts your flexibility for tricks.

Bumps and Bruises

Common places for bruises caused by snowboarding are abdominal bruising, facial bruising and, sad to say, bruised buttocks are also painfully common. Your buttocks are your body’s shock absorbers, especially when falling over backward on a snowboard, but they will bruise and those bruises can be painful. Fortunately, the pain should only last a few days and the colour will fade as well.

The only way to avoid bumps and bruises from snowboarding is not to go snowboarding

There are few rules and regulations regarding what you can wear on the slopes (helmets are only compulsory in a few countries) increasingly, however, people are realising that safety gear is an important part of any winter sport, and snowboarding is no different. Hopefully, a raised awareness of the consequences of injuries will lead to more safety gear being worn, and fewer snowboarders being injured.

Wintersports Travel Insurance Offers Extra Protection On The Slopes

If you are badly injured while snowboarding, you may need helicopter assistance with getting off the mountainside, and may even need to get back to your home country for treatment which is why you should make sure that your travel insurance covers you for the activities you plan to do – even if you are holidaying in the EU. Wintersports insurance from worldwideinsure.com provides cover for equipment, cancelled flights, medical assistance and repatriation for all destinations including even if you want to go off-piste.